Insights & InterviewsHow to get noticed in the City

How to get noticed in the City

Are you just starting out on a career in the City, switching to a new field of finance, or looking to progress? Logan Naidu, the founder and chief executive of Dartmouth Partners, has some advice.

Are you just starting out on a career in the City, switching to a new field of finance, or looking to progress? Logan Naidu, the founder and chief executive of Dartmouth Partners, has some advice.

First, says Naidu, dress for success. “Dressing smartly and spending a little money on what you wear to work will show you care about your appearance and reflect well on your attitude,” he explains.

But looking the part also means taking into account how your senior colleagues and clients dress and making sure you don’t go overboard. “For both men and women, it’s best to err on the side of conservatism,” he says.

Secondly, Naidu warns, don’t let it go to your head. You may have got a foot in the door, but that’s no excuse to get arrogant – you should stay humble, at least until you’ve proved yourself.

“The most impressive thing of all is to remain dignified in your achievements,” says Naidu. “Within the office, even if you feel you are taking on more responsibility than your title should involve, don’t assume this equals immediate progression.

Part of this humility means working hard without complaint. Getting the job done – even if these tasks aren’t things you particularly want to do – will give your reputation a huge boost. “You may be best friends with the person sitting next to you, but it’s not a nice feeling to see them progress quicker than you because you’ve let your standards slip. Be ruthless and in some cases be selfish. It’s in your own best interests,” says Naidu.

Finally, it’s never too soon to start networking.

Business is all about contacts. Expanding your network outside your immediate business is great for your reputation within the industry, useful for seeking out potential clients, and a skill that will make you more desirable to future employers,” said Naidu. “If you can start new relationships and nurture existing ones, you are adding value to the wider organisation and going that all-important extra mile.”

 

 

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