RegionsEEAPoles ready for switch to non-cash payments

Poles ready for switch to non-cash payments

Poland’s business and consumers are ready to switch to contactless payments according to a survey by SIA, with 41% of respondents perceiving them as the most modern method among various non-cash payments available on the Polish market.

Poland’s business and consumers are ready to switch to contactless payments according to a survey by SIA, with 41% of respondents perceiving them as the most modern method among various non-cash payments available on the Polish market.

Payments via mobile devices were cited by 36%, closely followed by payment cards or online bank transfers, which both got 35% of responses.

The survey, conducted for the technology infrastructures group by the independent Polish market research institute ARC Rynek i Opinia, canvassed opinion from 800 respondents and was released to coincide with SIA’s conference in Warsaw on the future of Poland’s payments industry.

Speed and time savings were cited as the most important values of e-payments by 55% of respondents, while 56% said they considered innovative solutions offered by their bank ‘very important’ or ‘rather important’. The values most associated with electronic payments are user friendliness (90% of respondents), innovation (43%) and security (36%).

On the issue of security, respondents were asked if they personally knew anyone who had fallen victim to a fraud: only 15% responded affirmatively and 24% believed that fraud was a result of “the victim’s recklessness and negligence”.

The survey also showed that 75% of respondents knew about payment systems such as PayPal, SkyCash, MobilNET, but only 14% said they are actually users) while payments via mobile phone using near field communication (NFC) technology was known by 74% but used by only 4%.

Nearly two in three respondents agree that both banks and customers are beneficiaries of modern methods of non-cash payments. The bank benefit mentioned by more respondents than any other was profit, followed by “promotion of the institution”, while convenience and speed were regarded as the main benefits for customers.

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